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Crystal meth epidemic hits Montreal: Life or meth?

Life or meth?

Photo: Jocelyn Michel

AIDS educators fear Montreal's ticking crystal time bomb will explode into addiction and new HIV outbreak

It’s a day gays won’t soon forget, much like the day when gays first read about AIDS way back in 1981.

On February 11 this year, the New York City Department of Health announced that a gay New Yorker, after repeatedly barebacking while high on crystal meth, was diagnosed with an aggressively virulent HIV supervirus last December, a strain resistant to almost every anti-HIV drug.

The patient then progressed to full-blown AIDS within four months – a transition that usually takes about 10 years.

Within hours the denial in the gay community was eerily reminiscent of that initial reaction to AIDS: This was, after all, only one case.

But many activists seized the NYC health alert as an opportunity to point out that a new plague is sweeping gay communities across North America – crystal methamphetamine, a drug that keeps users, or "tweakers," up for days, dispensing with safer sex and engaging in bareback sex with multiple partners in one night.

"First people pointed fingers at the L.A. crystal queens," says Montreal artist Kat Coric, who has organized local HIV-education events for years. "It was ghetto. Then it spread to NYC and Toronto. Now it’s in Montreal. We’re not at the beginning – we’re in the middle stages. And most people are still in their denial stage. ‘I’m not like so-and-so.’ They just keep dancing. But it takes people [about] five years to crash. They lose their minds, their jobs, their savings."

Those who bareback on crystal meth can also lose their lives.

Crystal meth’s bumpy ride

Montreal police say crystal meth is not a problem in this city. Police spokesperson Melissa Carroll told Hour the department seized "163 pills" in 2004. "And that’s nothing," Carroll says. "[In contrast] we seized 1,352 pills of speed in 2004 and [fewer than] 2,000 of ecstasy."

But anecdotal evidence that crystal meth has arrived in Montreal is quickly piling up.

"My colleagues and I work at all the raves and it’s hard to say if [partygoers are high on] crystal, speed or coke," says Alexander Morin, executive director of GRIP (Group de recherche et de l’intervention psychosociale). "We know for sure when people come up to us and tell us. But if people are up for 72 hours, you can pretty well assume they’re on crystal."

The situation is similar at Montreal’s afterhours clubs, as well as at Bad Boy Club Montreal circuit parties like Black & Blue, where Dr. Pierre Tellier co-ordinates BBCM’s on-site medical teams.

"We are seeing more [people coming to] the infirmary for GHB and [ketamine], but we realize crystal meth is in the environment," Tellier says.

The attraction, of course, is that crystal methamphetamine – also known as Tina, crank or ice, and which sells for $60 a quarter-gram – creates euphoria and increases the sex drive, enhances sexual experience and reduces inhibitions. You can swallow, snort, smoke or inject it. You can also "booty bump" it by dabbing it up your ass.

"Crystal meth’s ability to keep users awake and feeling good for long periods of time has made it a popular drug in the dance club scene and in circuit parties," reports the Canadian AIDS Society.

CAS further points out, "Because of its potent effect on stamina and sex drive, the drug has become popular with gay and bisexual men who attend dance clubs and sex parties. Rituals of multi-partner barebacking have been developed around crystal meth. Crystal meth is often used with ketamine, a drug which loosens the sphincter, and with Viagra to overcome what is known as "crystal dick," or impotence that often accompanies the use of crystal meth."

"Crystal dick" has more men "bottoming" on crystal, a phenomenon veteran journalist Franck Sanello documents in his just-published bestseller Tweakers: How Crystal Meth Is Ravaging Gay America (Alyson Books).

"It all feels so intense and so good – having your ass played with, getting fucked with dildos, or whatever," one tweaker tells Sanello. "It’s like you could drive a Mack truck up your ass and it would feel good."

"You get long sessions of anal sex rather than shorter," Sanello told Hour this week. "Crystal meth acts as both a stimulant and an anesthetic. You can have anal sex for days and not feel any pain."

And if you tear up your ass barebacking you risk becoming infected with HIV.

Coric also adds, "The high obtained from the use of crystal comes with an unavoidable mental low which leaves the user feeling extremely depressed, unable to go on, lethargic, lazy, angry, confused, paranoid, delusional, et cetera… Of course these feelings of panic and paranoia worsen as users have less and less sleep after binging for a week."

Montreal’s crystal palace

Methamphetamine was originally synthesized from ephedrine in Japan in 1893. Over a century later, in 1998, the arrival of Viagra ignited the virus-like spread of crystal meth, which had previously been unpopular because of "crystal dick."

"I’ve been waiting for crystal [to explode] in Montreal for about five years and, to be honest, those using crystal meth are mostly people in Montreal’s gay community who travel to cities like NYC and San Francisco," says Kathy Tremblay of Montreal’s HIV-prevention group Séro Zéro. "But it’s still a small group of people mostly connected with the circuit parties."

However, while researching Tweakers, Sanello says that when he "told straight teens crystal is ravaging gay America, they told me, ‘It’s ravaging straight America.’"

Which is one reason why Alexander Morin of GRIP and Kathy Tremblay of Séro Zéro are both manning education kiosks at the mixed-crowd Bal en Blanc all-nighter this weekend. The rave is expected to draw 15,000 partygoers at the Palais des Congrès.

"In the club world, especially in the gay club world, you hear crystal meth is equal to free HIV," says David Morales, the famed DJ headlining Bal en Blanc. "I tell [tweakers], ‘You’re taking a risk.’ People get so fucked up they don’t remember who they slept with."

In its March 19 edition the medical journal The Lancet sounded yet another alarm about the drug, publishing the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Centre’s fast-track investigation of the gay New Yorker who contracted the HIV supervirus after barebacking on crystal meth.

Canadian health officials insist that the supervirus is not in Canada, though University of British Columbia AIDS researcher Julio Montaner says a similar HIV supervirus was reported in Vancouver in 2001.

Still, the AIDS Committee of Toronto stated on February 25 it is unhappy the NYC HIV supervirus health alert mentioned crystal meth use. "These are two separate issues [and] linking them only creates blame," ACT states.

Kat Coric is less charitable.

"This desperate quest for a [crystal meth] high is often referred to as – pardon me – ‘chasing the dragon’ or ‘sucking the cock of the devil,’" Coric says. "Crystal permanently changes the brain’s chemistry, permanently damages internal organs and causes irreparable dental devastation.

"I have seen crystal meth’s vicious circular death cycle," Coric affirms, "and if I had the chance I would destroy that drug forever."

If you need help dealing with crystal meth, call GRIP at 276-6110 or Séro Zéro at 521-7778, and surf to www.buzzcode.org and www.lifeormeth.com.

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  • by Natalie Dzepina - March 24, 2005, 8:23 am

    Unfortunately, we have a friend who we suspect is using that drug. He is up for days and when he crashes, he sleeps so deep that tickling or pinching won’t wake him up! Then comes, as the article mentions, the inevitable depression, confusion, anger, etc.
    He’s no longer the same person. We mourn the loss of our dear friend. We had to stop our friendship because, quite frankly, I got afraid. My husband got into an argument with him and I really got scared. He went ballistic. I told my husband to stay away from him at all costs.
    Don’t think we’re abandonning him. His ex-girlfriend tried and tried and tried to get help for him, to no avail. My husband tried and tried to talk to him, to get him to quit, to get him to talk to someone… to no avail.
    You have to realize that if the person is not willing to help him/herself, there is absolutely nothing you can do. Sad but true.

  • by S Stewart - March 24, 2005, 9:16 am

    Okay, that did it! I am officially not sleeping with anyone ever again until they fill out a ten part questionaire, take ten vials of blood for analysis, and pee into a cup.
    Although I know on the surface that this kind of stuff goes on I guess I was in denial. It’s a great in-your-face kind of article that just shakes away all the excitement associated with a one nighter. But then again I am not on drugs so I can think rationally enough to say that.
    Why do people feel that they have to be so anesthetized? Is their life so difficult or boring? I think that it is a shame that so many people would rather pop a pill or whatever to feel good when the consequences are so grave. Maybe I just don’t get it.

  • by Jesse Stacey - March 24, 2005, 11:13 am

    Why does it seem like everyone has this urgent need to run with the devil and experience the ultimate rush synthetically? I think before certain designer drugs became available society was more in touch with ways of achieving this state through everyday attainable experiences. Take a chance, not necesarilly with your health but with your own life. Change your profession, bungy jump or skydive, jump a random train to god knows where, visit one of Montreal’s many sex boutiques, strap a ghettoblaster to your bike and ride around town blaring ABBA tunes, go to a church and debate that god lives underwater, become a monk, try a new sexual position, take up a safer sexual fetish like asphyxiation / inflation or foot fetishism, grow a garden, change your name, kiss random desireable people you see on a sunny day in the park saying "oh my god, your the one!" and wait for the outcome. Don’t think it’s realistic, or as accessible as a pill? try it, you’ll be overwhelmed with a gush of both high and low "trips". Setting off sparks of euphoria is just a glance away, not just some privelege for Fleischmann’s margarine users. Grow some balls and embrace the light that gave you life.

  • by Eric Wilson - March 24, 2005, 12:13 pm

    Instead of debating whether pot is bad, or whether is should be legal, the police, and the government should be paying attention Crytal Meth, a dangerous, and often lethal drug. If it was killing off rich west islanders, instead of homosexuals, maybe the police would do something. But instead, they seem content to sit on the side and watch this problem grow, without really saying anything. Remember when they last did that? It involved a little something called AIDS. It is time for Montreal to take a stand, and close this city to drugs like Crystal Meth.

  • by Gary Womac - March 24, 2005, 1:00 pm

    whether the statistics bares the facts or not, what needs to be looked at goes beyond number crunching.
    motives exist. what inspires any individual to risk their lives and the lives of others, in ‘chasing the dragon’?
    for far too many years, there has been a stigma surrounding any so-called ‘recreational drug use’ that dates back to marijuana propaganda during the early twentieth century. federal government sponsored films condemning
    both marijuana and sex (can we recall the cult film ‘reefer madness’..) as evil, obviously didn’t attempt to truly address the situation. and while many can sit down and laugh at the absurb claims made by ‘reefer madness’, no one should be laughing at the denial that continues to exist about ‘recreational drugs’ and sex.
    the traditional churchstate rhetoric about ‘sin’, and what constitutes ‘sin’, has failed miserably. this rhetoric, however, has gone forth to create miseries and spiritual stagnation in the lives of the endless many. the mantra of the churchstate remains enduring: to be ‘good’ and to be ‘normal’ to receive god’s eternal love. this message alone has created deep wounds not only among the gay community, still considered the minority looking to get into the mainstream of ‘normal’ married couples, but these deep wounds also belongs to the straight teens, seeking to explore the personal terrains of drug use and sensuality.
    however, in the junkyard terrains of high-gloss culture, where ‘reality tv’ attempts to define ‘normal’ using scripted, one-dimensional caricatures, where are the true elders to provide true spiritual insights? instead, gays and teens alike are subjected to the condemnations of the corrupt establishment of the churchstate, upholding the dead corpse of dogma.
    where are the minds that truly understands these wounds? where are the minds willing to offer insights into the truths of spirituality? that god remains within us all, and doesn’t condemn the confused teen nor the gay individual.

  • by David Allan - March 24, 2005, 3:30 pm

    Dude, meth is the fuckin worst. It really beats the shit out of coke when it comes to sheer destruction.
    I am a consistent user of illegal substances, and I can without a doubt say that meth truly is the deadliest, lousiest, junkiest, most horrid thing you can put in your body. Worse than crack. And if you do blow regularly it seems like such a small jump to do a bump of it……DONT. For real, that shit will have you hearing voices and picking your face within a week. It only goes downhill from there.

  • by Dawn Manhertz - March 24, 2005, 5:19 pm

    I appreciate the amount of research and first hand professional input went into the making of this "Life or Meth?" article. I thought that I was sufficiently informed about the drug, but as a health care professional, I can see that we’ve all got loads more to learn, and this is only one drug we’re talking about! An ENOURMOUSLY powerful, and unfortunately extremely popular drug, especially in combination with viagra.
    What a chemical world we’re living in, I’m almost ashamed to say that I belong to such a ‘constantly HIGH-seeking society’.
    Its encouraging to hear about organisations such as GRIP and Séro Zéro. I’d love to get in touch with them, and look about the possibility of volunteering with them, or somehow doing my part to combat this HIV-virus truckin’ drug scene.
    What’s the thrill in accelerating death? I guess I’ll never know.

  • by Renessa Cabrera - March 24, 2005, 7:04 pm

    Sadly drugs seem to go with hand in hand with the rave scene. So it is not surprising that there is a rise in a drug like crystal meth that allows you to go all night and day. The other side affects of a serious drug like this is a possible heart attack and psychosis. Try to sell that to kids and everyone would say no. Then again people don’t think of the side affects but rather the immediate gratification. You seriously don’t want this drug in Canada. To put a face on this and put it in perspective the guy in California who stole an army tank terrorized neighborhoods,did massive destruction was chased by police for hours and finally was shot to death,well he was on this drug.

  • by Melanie Renaud - March 25, 2005, 8:01 pm

    Chrystal Meth is quite scary. I’ve tried it a couple of times, pretty powerful drug… Much nicer than speed because it is stronger and less pain in my back the next day. But i only tried it mixed in with water, special water…
    One of my friend was a chrystal addict and wow very scary… It really messes with your brain and changes you a lot. He was a different person before. Now he’s been off chrystal for a couple of months but still thinks about it all the time and wants it badly.
    It is getting more popular in montreal in the afterhour scene but not as easy to get as everything else. I hope it doesn’t get crazy meth addiction in Montreal.
    I won’t say don’t do drugs because I’m not well placed to say that but try to avoid chrystal.

  • by Gerry Samson - March 26, 2005, 7:27 am

    This all brand new news to me and its very fighting to read that people are getting Aids from this Crystal meth. This article will teach people the dangers of drugs and how it can ruin your life in just a split second. Many of these drugs have been coming in and out of the clubs and I can’t believe that people would endanger their lives by taking dangerous drugs. It very sad to see that people with substance abuse problems don’t find help that they deserve. I believe when people read this article they will stop someone from taking the drug or even the person will stop.

  • by Arlen Geoffries - March 26, 2005, 9:55 am

    pto say this was a great article. There was a lot of information without being verbose, judgemental or preachy so I actually felt like reading on. I really learned something. I liked "You spin me around" too… I can relate – same age group :-/

  • by Nathalie Verbruggen - March 26, 2005, 2:21 pm

    Well … I simply wanted to comment to those people who dont GET IT .. im not a homosexual but I beieve that when people say "they rush to get high and party!"well yes they do .. and why more then hetero ? Ill tell you .. because gay people dont have as many children as straight couples do .. so they have the money to spend ..they have the time to party … and thats why they have time to decorate beautiful appartments ( out of the subject but so very true!) These people I see them in Raves … I party too .. and I dont take drugs often simply because I have responsabilities that they dont have .. so perhaps a little bit of all this is coming from their equal right to ours ?? dont you think so ?

  • by Pedro Eggers - March 26, 2005, 5:22 pm

    The cross-correlation between drug use and the spread of AIDS is undeniable so nothing in this article should come as a grand shock to anyone who’s kept their ear to the ground for the past few years. Frankly, the crystal meth boom was inevitable so the Montreal police saying crystal meth is not a problem in this city rings a tad hollow. I mean I’m supposed to take their word on this when they’ve broken the public trust time and time again and have shown a clear pattern of willful ignorance in matters that they deem ‘under control’.
    <>>
    Look, HIV and AIDS are *not* going away so why in the hell would you court the devil further by playing chiken with him? Is getting a high worth dying for? Is it really?

  • by Maria Cecillia Silva - March 26, 2005, 8:00 pm

    I guess every generation had its problems. But just like every war is getting more dangerous weapons ,so are the dangers of everyday life with this generation . THere are more violent crimes, there are more deaths caused by alcohool and there are more drugs out there that kill. There are alot more deadly diseases and viruses and there are less antibiotics that work to kill these diseases and viruses and less answers to the growing problem with violence.
    I believe that one ot the solutions to help the generation of today was to educate them more on the dangers of drugs and these deadly diseases. But kids or our youth has also grown to be tougher and even when they are informed of the dangers they proceed to defeat the odds and try out what ever life offers them. I am not surprised and I don’t have the answers to the solution . I think kids are growing up to fast and they are being raised industrially ( daycares ) and the churches are dieing and there are no more moral values given within the family. We are seeing people being lied to by there gouvernments. We are see the extreme of revenge of one nation againts another . I guess the youth of today have little to look forward to and so it makes it easier to play Russian Roulet with their lives.
    They sell there lives to the devil for one moment of totally satisfaction and that is the price they will pay. It is a sacrier picture to think of what is going to happen in the near future.

  • by George Jehan - March 26, 2005, 11:06 pm

    Crystal Meth equals HIV! Crystal Meth will kill you!
    Bullshit! Wake up people – Crystal is just another drug. We have heard the same rhetoric spouted for every other drug and yet people keep doing them.
    How many people die from smoking per year? from alcohol? from speeding? What about coke, or speed or exctacy or GHB – or even poppers? How about gambling? And yet, Lotto-Quebec ads are everywhere. Crystal has this big rep but there are PLENTY of other ways to hurt yourself.
    We don’t pull alcohol and cigarettes from the shelves because of people who go too far. And for most young people who party & use other goodies, there is a line between recreation and obsession.
    Whether it’s crystal or some other way, abusers need counselling and help with self-esteem, not general prohibition. Demonizing Crystal won’t solve the problem and will move the focus from where it really belongs: the reasons that people do drugs, party, gamble, smoke, etc.
    Personally, I have done crystal as well as other stuff and I’m very much in control of my life, thank you very much. Just as some people can handle their drinking, they can also handle other substances.
    People do NOT get HIV from crystal, they get it from risky behaviour – and if you have been keeping up with statistics at all, you know that some people have been practising unsafe sex for years. It’s nothing new.
    Again, this is something that concerns self-esteem and requires counselling – not scare tactics.
    As for the guy in NYC – is it stupid to have hundreds of unsafe-sex encounters in a week tweaked out of your mind? OF COURSE it is. But so is spending all your money at the casino or getting drunk every day. And in this guy’s case, the facts have been exaggerated and misrepresented. But you need more than headline news to understand this.
    The fact that Hour has placed such an unbalanced fright article on their front page is disappointing – especially from Richard Burnett, a writer with whom I usually agree.

    • by Alex Tiller - April 15, 2012, 7:12 pm

      Please write to me alexander321@hotmail.fr I am doing research on the cons but also on the pros of Crystal… nobody ever speaks of the latest! Thank. Alex.

  • by Robert Bichage - March 26, 2005, 11:12 pm

    There are very few drugs that have been synthesized that are not useful in one way or the other. Diamorphine, for instance, attained the moniker "heroin" due to its very effective and indeed heroic pain relieving capabilities.
    There are both responsible and irresponsible ways to use all drugs. Abusers of drugs are interesting in that they are both the victims and perpetrators of the pain their drug use engenders, both to themselves and others. They are, in fact, both victims and perpetrators by their own hand.
    The social reasons that lead to drug abuse are too difficult for your humble reviewer to dissect in any kind of detail. However, it is clear to me that legislation, especially punitive legislation, in isolation to any other measures, is not necessarily the most effective means of solving the problem of drug abuse.
    Couple irresponsible drug use with irresponsible sexual behaviour and you clearly have a recipe for disaster in multifarious and many headed forms.
    Pleasure is a thankful distraction from the dreary business of living, but when it puts that business at danger of permanent loss, a re-evaluation is necessary. Everyone should conduct their lives as they see fit and according to the dictates of their conscience. But what if they have no conscience? Then it is imperative that the rest of society act to protect itself. Such action should not be violent, but palliative, for our poor abandoned hedonist is himself/herself a member of society. He or She is us. Remember … there but for the grace of God go you or I. So love your local junkie. All we need is love anyway.

  • by Lisa Gratton - March 26, 2005, 11:18 pm

    Sometimes I wish we were living in the prehistoric age, where none of these drugs existed, but unfortunately we’re in the 21st century, where science is giving us more and more things to help destroy ourselves. How convenient.
    Though I’ve heard of crystal meth before this is new information to me, and I absolutely certain that it is for quite a lot of people.We have organisation that do go into our schools and talk about drugs and AIDS, but I guess one of the biggest problems is that we always think that it’ll never happen to us, so we don’t care and don’t take the proper procedures for being safe. Or we take those drugs oblivious to the damage it’ll cause to our brain and our body. And the next thing you know, you end up in coffin…This article is really a slap in the face for a lot of people.

  • by Justin Leduc - March 27, 2005, 12:44 am

    I’m sorry if I’m not too sympathetic to people who contract Aids while high and having unprotected sex with multiple partners…you play with fire, chances are you’ll get burned, right? It’s irresponsible, and just plain dumb.You’d think that there is enough education out there for people to be aware of this type of thing, but I’m not going to feel too bad about some "tweakers" getting sexually transmitted diseases while they’re out screwing anything with a pulse. I do feel bad for the person who ends up with one of these guys, falls in love, only has him for a partner, then dies of aids. That’s the real tragedy.

  • by Vladimir Joseph - March 27, 2005, 7:49 pm

    Meth? Dude, what kind of loser gets hooked on this stuff? This shit is just rancid, I`ve seen some people on it and I just don`t see what is so good about it. I`m not saying taking drugs is cool but to try meth? That`s just whack.

  • by Mark St Pierre - March 29, 2005, 1:41 am

    If it’s not one drug scourge, it’s another. This particular drug, though, has some pretty disturbing ramifications. You see, beneath the veneer of unbridled hedonistic pleasure that crystal meth promises, also lies the specter of death – aka AIDS. Not only does this party drug exacerbate an already volatile situation, it also threatens to decimate both gays and straights alike. HIV remains one of the most frightfully lethal viruses that one could possibly contract, so the prospect of a super-virus born of sexual impropriety is mind-numbingly scary. Responsible sexual conduct precludes the use of crystal meth and other such mood-enhancing/judgement-erradicating drugs. To put it simply and in no uncertain terms, safe sex is no longer a personal prerogative, it is both an absolute necessity, as well as a communal responsibilty!

  • by Steve Landry - March 29, 2005, 2:39 pm

    We are so much in a rush to get somewhere…to the store, to the bar, to work, to get laid, to get high that we are willing to take risks that most times are not well thought out.
    Why has our lifestyle changed so much that we are in so much of a hurry?
    Where has our patience gone? Why are we willing to inject all kinds of crap into our arms, legs, ass and other places just to get a little short whoosh of relative euphoria?
    Escaping from reality is for some, the only way to deal with stress and pain experienced in lives of frequent injustices and costly mistakes. Drug dealers and chemists that meander about to dole out their crap don’t stick around (no pun intended) to see the results of what their concoctions do to their customers. Why would they care? Many of them are users themselves suporting their own habit by bringing other "crackheads" into their lair.
    The rule of thumb generally is: No matter how curious you are to try drugs, your body and mind will convince you that it now has adapted to needing more of them after your first hit, even though every report you can find will say otherwise. Mess with your brain cells and bad things will happen.
    This article strikes the first match but there is much more that needs to be shared about how Crystal Meth (for example) and other drugs cause their users to crash and burn~there is no forgiveness once you’re hooked because you’ve lost your power once the drug sucks you in.
    Don’t be a fool to believe that you can take just one hit and walk away.
    The "grass" is not always greener on the other side.

  • by June Thaggard - March 29, 2005, 7:56 pm

    This guy is stero typing guy men. Like they need any help getting people against them, then he fucks it up even more by using drugs. I can’t say that I have ever used meth. But I do know that I never will. I don’t mind a trip once in a while, but I couldn’t imagine doing that crap. It is too bad that people just don’t care about themselves enough to use protection. And that they are so weak that they can not stop using. How sad.

  • by Heather Lee - March 30, 2005, 10:27 am

    It’s unfortunate that those tireless workers in the the AIDS education and prevention sectors have been dealt this chrstal meth blow. Their endless efforts to educate and spread the word to our sexually-debuting youth was begining to sink in, despite the fact that a small percentage of the city’s population still engages in sexually-risky behaviour. The ramifications of ingesting this designer drug far outweigh the perceived benefits. The well-documented physiological damage to the human body is readily available for anyone who is self-respecting enough to take the time to do the research. Wake up and smell the coffee. The last thing that the Montreal community needs is a more potent strain of HIV infection. Let’s get back to basics. Practice safer sex within the confines of a committed and meaningful relationship. Let’s grow up.

  • by Todd Funai - April 14, 2005, 6:25 pm

    11 of Crystal Meth., the vision of Southern Rednecks brewing up a batch in a shack, secluded deep in the woods comes to mind. Just like their forefathers, brewing their moonshine. Like fire it’s engulfed the southern trailerparks, and is now spreading to all parts. One can compare it to "The White Mans Crack". I would have never thought of it as the next "X" or "G.H.B." party drug. I can not throw the first stone. I will pass along a word of advice. Remember that this is a man made drug. You do not know the poisons within the drug. One should do a bit of research into this and then make educated/responsible decisions.

  • by Stephen Talko - April 20, 2005, 4:21 pm

    In last night’s episode of Law and Order SVU, methamphetamine created a lot of serious problems for the detectives. Dozens of pharmacies were targetted for their cold medicine which were brazenly stolen because they serve as one of the raw ingredients. Law enforcement experts are aware that chemical labs to set up the valuable end product could be located anywhere and the explosive mixtures produced could demolish a house if not knocking you out before with the poisonous fumes. A booby-trapped house almost killed a police officer during that particular show. Even those who never take illegal drugs have to be concerned about this issue. It would be a shame to have innocent bystanders killed because of the manufacture and selling of methamphetamine. More support should be given to web sites such as lifeormeth.com mentioned at the end of the article which had to suspend its activities last week because of lack of funding.

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called “addiction” can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Kilev Alexis - December 16, 2005, 10:57 am

    I have smoked crystal meth, I have snorted heroine, I have snorted cocaine, I have smoked pot, I have eaten mushrooms, and I’ve dropped acid. I’ve done them all a fair amount. If the propganda is to be believed I should be an addicted, strung out, loser who can’t function in society. That could not be farther from the truth.
    I am not addicted to any of the drugs I’ve taken. In fact I haven’t taken or desired a drug in nearly a month. I’d do one if it were available but I’m fine otherwise. I think favorably of doing drugs but that never spills over into some insane, uncontrolable craving for them.
    Personally I believe that addiction is only partly a physical thing and that the overwhelming majority of the blame for so called "addiction" can be attributed to addicts being weak willed, weak minded individuals. My mother was a hard-core drug addict for many years who later quit but went on to become addicted to gambling. Gamblic does nothing to chemically alter a person and yet she became addicted. It was a weak will that allowed this to happen. I believe it’s the same with drugs.
    I see so many people who have admittedly NEVER tried drugs getting up and denouncing the dangers and evils of drug abuse. That, to me is like denouncing the dangers and evils of riding a roller coaster without ever getting on one. We have uninformed zealots influencing drug policies around the globe and people are too stupid to notice the lies and propaganda all around them. THAT is the sad aspect of drug culture, the fact that it get so marginalized by the idiots in power that a black market springs up around it, that those weak willed addicts can’t seek help with their issues without being stigmatized, and that drug prices skyrocket so much that these addicts have to resort at times to crime in order to afford them. That is the real danger of drug abuse… not the users but the people who brainwash the masses into fighting a never-ending no-win war of drugs and their users. Wise up

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of “usual suspects” has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become “argument days” as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Aaron Lockyer - July 27, 2006, 5:49 pm

    Living in the sleepy, isolated, and conservative city of Perth, Western Australia, I expected that Meth would take a long time to gain street prevailence but alas, no.
    The disturbing part is that the list of "usual suspects" has changed. I know people who are married, working serious jobs, and spending whole weekends getting high on meth. Mondays and tuesdays have become "argument days" as these users begin to crash from their highs.
    In sheer desperation, I threatened to tell my good friend’s boss that his star employee was using Meth. I had no real intention of doing so but my friend was getting out of control and I needed to snap him out of it. Thankfully, with the help of his wife and his parents, he has managed to stop his binges but he still caves in occasionally….
    Okay, so here’s the rub….This young man has, throughout my life until recently, been my main role-model. He was always the voice of reason, caution, and moderation amongst my circle of friends. Everybody looked up to him and sought him out for advice but not anymore.
    My friend is an engineer who owns two homes. I shudder to think of how far he might fall. Thankfully for him, he has a strong circle of friends who are willing to help him. To think of the path that awaits a user who is maladjusted and socially isolated is abolutely terrifying.

  • by Paul Davis - August 25, 2007, 3:26 pm

    A very beautiful friend of my sisters died last week having become addicted to this terrible drug, committing suicide. She was talented, happy, sweet and simply a wonderful girl. 49 years old. Beauty, love, future and hope all gone. First, let’s have the death penalty for anyone dealing drugs. it will slow these peidemics of destructino down. Recreational Drugs are the worst enemy in modern society.

  • by Mike Levinski - February 2, 2008, 5:12 am

    People do not contract HIV from doing meth. They contract HIV from having unprotected sex. Meth may cause teeth decay, weight loss, heart attacks and strokes, but it does not cause HIV. In my opinion, this article is very misleading, although the facts presented are accurate for the most part. People who have unprotected sex do it intoxicated or not. It is so easy to blame people’s stupidity on drugs. This article kinda reminds me of Reefer Madness.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.

  • by Damian Abrahams - March 4, 2008, 2:21 pm

    Most people believe that it is Crystal Meth is the problem. “If it wasn’t for Meth, my son wouldn’t be the way he is!” This proclaimation is all to familiar the country across. I have been able to overcome my Meth addiction and realized that it was only the solution. Meth was my solution to an unbearable reality; the whole world was against me and, having a childhood that didn’t promote a healthy lifestyle, I was unable to cope with what came my way. I had the same “problems” as any other person, bills, rent, utilities, family life; all that life demanded. The problem is, I did what I knew. I knew how to disconnect myself from people; they only hurt me and called me names like “stupid little indian”. I knew how keep my shoes and clothes on when I went to bed “just in case”. I knew that I have to stuff my emotions deep down; it’s not that I didn’t like emotions, it’s just they really really hurt. I knew I had to forget the pain of sexual, emotional, mental and physical abuse. I knew that nobody cared about me; not even my own mother. Once I tried alcohol, I knew that I could do all this without effort, I just had to take the next drink. As evil as alcohol is, it just didn’t compare to Meth. When I discovered meth, I covered my past with a thick blanket of denial and false happiness. Emotions are a powerful thing, for 5 years I covered them up with Meth, yet there they were, coming at me with full force; a force that not even Meth could resist! How I escaped Meth with my life I will never know, maybe I stopped doing what I knew. All I can say is that I’m glad I escaped my storm.